Books I Read in 2014

This year I read 40 books.  I’m almost done with a few more really long books but I’m saving them for next year.  My goal was to read only 25 books — I think I figured that my reading would drop off with trying to work on creating practical blocks of code and learning algorithms, but I also did a bit of traveling up and down the coast, so that allowed for more reading time.

They are rated from 1 to 10.  I rated 10 of the 40 books this year a 10.  As always, the books I think are absolutely worth reading and which I think say something profound or new are rated at a 10.  Rarely do I rate below a 6, just because I wouldn’t have chosen to read the book anyway if I knew it was that bad. 9’s and 8’s are usually solid books, but not must-reads.  7’s I appreciated the content and was satisfied with my choosing to read them.

This year I added very very brief comments giving my 2-second gut review.

This year, my emphasis has been on deepening my understanding of code quality, algorithmic efficiency, and runtime speed as I try to become a more seasoned programmer.  My goal has been to practice more C and C++ to learn from a sound fundamental base.  I also tried to become stronger in devops-related topics.

I think this has been my best year for reading books written by women.  In the past I had read the Hunger Games, The Giver, and Harry Potter series, and those shouldn’t all count as uniques.  But this year I was delighted to read some fascinating investigative journalism books (on chocolate, Chinese consumerism, and shipping) and a couple amazing memoirs (Julia Child and the woman with the brain on fire).

In the coming year I’m going to try to read 40 books.  In particular, if you have suggestions for investigatory journalism books, I’d love to read them!  I also love books with biographies on great persons or great projects.

Previous years: